When linking banks for yourself or your connected customers, the most common error is entering the wrong bank code.


Bank codes have different names depending on which country your bank account is located. Here is a list that will give you some guidance on which number to choose and how it is referred to in your country. You can also ask your bank if you are not sure.




Country and CurrencyBank Code NameFormatNotes
Australia (AUD)Bank State Branch or BSB


6 digit number format

XXX-ZZZ

An example of a BSB code from NAB bank: 082902. 08 is the two-digit code for NAB bank. The third digit (2) means the branch is located in Australian Capital Territory. The last three digits (902) mean this is the NAB branch in Canberra City.


United Kingdom (GBP)Sort Code

6 digit number format XX-YY-ZZ



Canada (CAD)Clearing Code9 Digit Number.0 + Financial Institution Number + Transit or Branch Number

In the below example the bank code is

0+004+12345

ie 00412345

Click to enlarge

Unites States (USD)ACH Routing Number9 Digit NumberTypically the number on the front of your check, but confirm with the bank as sometimes it is different.


         Click to enlarge
VietnamSwift8 or 11 characters

Example:


BKKBVNVXHAN

Where:
BKKB: Bank code
VN: Country code
VX: Location code
HAN: Bank branch code






What is a BIC/SWIFT code and why do I need it in some cases?


A BIC (Bank Identifier Code) is a unique identifier for a bank. The acronym SWIFT is for the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication.

The correct code ensures that your money reaches your recipient's account at the bank. If you do not have this code for your recipient's bank, your recipient should check with their bank for an accurate BIC/SWIFT code.

The SWIFT/BIC consists of either eight or 11 characters: four letters identifying the bank, a two letter country code, two alphanumeric characters identifying the location of the bank, and sometimes three alphanumeric characters identifying a specific branch of the bank.